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Thursday, December 31, 2020

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Preschool Penguin Crafts for Kids

I was putting some preschool penguin crafts on our calendar for next month, and I realized we've already done a few through the years--it would be good to put them all in one spot!



We've had preschoolers at our house for more than a decade now, so I'm always cooking up new crafts and art projects for them. Some of our kids have really loved crafts while others will blow through them super fast and want to go run in circles!

My preschoolers right now are crafters. They will do an art project for more than an hour straight, so we have a lot of options with them. Obviously some of the projects we've done in the past were for kids with slightly shorter attention spans!

Another fun thing that I've noticed is that since we homeschool, my older kids often enjoy doing the same project as the younger kids, but the older kids refine it, add their own touches, and create a very different project inspired by the one the younger kids were doing!

Anyway, here's the collection! It's growing, and I'll link our new penguin crafts to it as I write about them!

Preschool Penguin Crafts for Kids



These adorable little penguin "pockets" were the brainchild of my daughter years ago! Pictures of them still make me smile! All you need are a few egg cartons, glue, wiggly eyes, paint, and orange foam!


This penguin art project was a combination of art and science! It was a two-day project where we made the backgrounds on one day and the penguins on the second day! I actually saved these because they came out so adorable!


We made these in December when ornament balls were everywhere, but you can grab ornament balls in January pretty easily or use foam balls any time of the year! These are super easy to make and personalize, and my kids all adored their own little penguins!


These craft stick penguins were SO easy to make, and made a great little manipulative to play with too!

These are the ones I have already written about--do you have a favorite preschool penguin craft your kids have done already? Or do you have plans for a new one? I'll be adding our new crafts into this page, so be sure and pop back if you're looking for more!

I also have a super fun penguin science project here, a penguin feather STEM activity here, and a whole penguin theme (or unit study) with math, science, and more HERE!

Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



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Wednesday, December 30, 2020

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Winter Preschool MEGA Packet!! Preschool Printable Activities!!

Are you looking for winter-themed preschool activities for January and February? Then you will LOVE this Winter Preschool MEGA Packet!!


I have combined all of my preschool winter printable activities to make this the ultimate preschool download for you this year! There are puzzles, patterns, letter activities, mazes, shadow matching, games, easy readers, and SO MUCH MORE!! It is the ultimate preschool bundle--all in one super convenient PDF!!

It has over 180 pages of printable activities!!

There are math, literacy, science, and more subjects covered!!

Classic January and February preschool themes include arctic and Antarctic animals, penguins, polar bears, winter, snow, mittens, Valentines, and more!!

What is in the

Winter Preschool MEGA Activity Packet?

Here is the Table of Contents:

1- Polar Bear Preschool Packet (over a dozen activities)

2- N is for Narwhal dot page

3- Who Likes the Cold?  (easy reader)

4- Awesome Arctic Animals Preschool Packet (over a dozen activities)

5- Antarctic BINGO

6- Penguin Preschool Packet (over a dozen activities)

7- P is for Penguin

8- Penguin Ice Cube Counting Game

9- Penguin Number Line

10-                Penguin Party (easy reader)

11-                Mitten Matching Activity

12-                Snowman Number Line Puzzles

13-                Snowflake Letters

14-                Winter Hat Maze

15-                Groundhog Matching

16-                Valentine Preschool Packet (Math & Literacy Activities)


You could literally print this out and have everything you need for the next two months!

And, to celebrate the New Year, I have a 25% off coupon for you!!  Just click on ADD TO CART and type NEWYEAR into the discount box!! I hope you love it!!

 


You can also get it on TpT here!


Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



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Thursday, December 17, 2020

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Preschool Christmas Printables

The activities in this Preschool Christmas Printables packet are hands-on, fun, and festive!



Preschool Christmas Printables

You can play matching games with your kids, spell names or sight words, color pictures, and more!

The 29 pages of activities include the following:

** Shadow Matching
** Candy Cane Matching
** Christmas Tree Spy
** B is for Bells dot pages
** Dot to Dot
** Which One is Different?
** 4-piece puzzles
** Paper Tree Decoration Activity
** Christmas Tree Letters
** Coloring Pages

And the best part?! It's FREE for 2 days!!


And if you're looking for more awesome FREE preschool Christmas activity ideas, check out my collection HERE!





Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



Never miss another post again!  Sign up for our weekly updates newsletter and get links to all our posts once a week in your inbox!  Sign up here!! 




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Tuesday, December 8, 2020

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FREE Preschool Christmas Animals Matching Cards

This adorable Christmas printable activity is perfect for preschoolers and toddlers who love matching games!


This set includes 6 Christmas images and their matching "shadows!" There is a Christmas tree card, a Christmas penguin, a Christmas pig, a snowman, a reindeer, and a Christmas polar bear! They are all adorable!!

They're perfect for homeschool, classroom stations, or just to pull out when you're getting dinner ready or want a calm-down activity before bed!

My older preschooler loves matching games and challenges! She especially likes to try finding more matches than me, lol! Here are a few activities to try:

** Place them all face-up on a table and match them.

** Place them all face-down on a table and take turns finding matches (like a memory game).

** Time how long it takes to match them.

** Print two sets and make identical matches (instead of shadow matches). This is especially helpful for younger preschoolers and toddlers. I actually did this for my 2-year old because he loves matching, but doesn't quite understand the goal behind matching the "shadows" to their colored version!

I recommend printing on cardstock for longer use. I used to laminate cards too, but my preschoolers right now are actually more careful with cards than some I've had in the past. ;) 

Please remember to share this printable by linking to THIS BLOG POST, and not the actual file itself. This allows me to continue to make more free activities! ๐Ÿ’–

FREE Preschool Christmas Matching Cards:


And Merry Christmas!!  ๐Ÿ’–


Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



Never miss another post again!  Sign up for our weekly updates newsletter and get links to all our posts once a week in your inbox!  Sign up here!!



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Tuesday, November 3, 2020

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Free Christmas Tree Counting Preschool Printable Counting Activity

A couple years ago I started a tradition of sharing free printable activities you can do with your preschooler! They are always popular, so I imagine a lot of you like them. ๐Ÿ˜‰ So, of course, I am happy to share some more with you this year! This one is sort of like a hidden picture, but you are counting Christmas trees!


This game-like activity lets your preschooler practice the following skills:

* sorting
 * visual discrimination
* counting
* number writing (this is definitely optional if your preschooler isn't ready for it!)
* one-to-one relationship
* comparing

And it all has a fun Christmas tree theme! (Confession, I started debating with myself about how early I can set up our Christmas tree on November 1st. It hasn't happened yet, but I cannot guarantee that i will wait until after Thanksgiving!)

Anyway, I like to print things like this and keep them handy for when my preschoolers want to "do school," and I don't have anything planned. My youngest two enjoy writing and doing worksheet-style activities more than their siblings did when they were younger, so it's actually really helpful for me to have activities like this ready to go!


And if you'd like to check out some of my other free CHRISTMAS PRESCHOOL PRINTABLES, click HERE!

I always love to hear from you, so feel free to email me or say "Hi!" on Facebook!


Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



Never miss another post again!  Sign up for our weekly updates newsletter and get links to all our posts once a week in your inbox!  Sign up here!!



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Saturday, October 10, 2020

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Homeschool Preschool: 9 Awesome Pre-K "Learning" Activities

This is our second How to Homeschool Preschool class! The topic for today is: 9 Awesome Pre-K "Learning" Activities! And, as you read through the "lesson," you will find a link to get this fantastic little printable reminder for free!


Homeschool Preschool


9 Awesome Preschool "Learning" Activities


A lot of people I know get stressed out about making sure their preschooler is "doing" enough "school." It turns out that there are TONS of educational "learning" activities that you should give you and your preschooler credit for!

As you consider the activities you plan into your preschoolers day, please remember the three "Big Picture" goals we talked about last time:

1- Help develop a love of learning.
2- Encourage a broad range of experiences.
3- Develop skills to learn more.

Amazingly, your child comes pre-programmed to explore, learn, and develop on their own! Preschoolers will naturally gravitate toward activities that they are ready to learn from and avoid activities that are too hard or too easy!

This is incredibly important to remember! I have met A LOT of parents who are stressed out that their 5-year old does not recognize all the letters of the alphabet or does not add and subtract. The simple fact is that just like walking and using the toilet, these are skills that our brains need to be ready to develop. There is a lot of development that needs to happen before we're ready, and our children will be drawn to the activities that they are ready for. If we try teaching them things that are truly too difficult or that they are truly not ready for, the stress from the experience produces hormones that block memory pathways in their brains, making it even more difficult to learn.

You should also know that I am a HUGE fan of learning through play and delight-directed activities. I consider preschoolers children 2-6 years old, or anybody who is not ready for "formal" education experiences. All of the things that preschoolers need to learn can be taught through play, fun adventures, and every-day activities. Tomorrow, we'll look more at formal lessons, but today, I want to go over some of the types of activities that you can provide for your children that are educational and meet the three Big Picture Goals

There are 9 activities that are common when you homeschool preschool, so I want to briefly go over each of them. They are listed in the image above, and you can download a printable copy of that HERE. It's not an exclusive list, but they are 9 wonderful activities!

It's also not in any particular order, but since you've hopefully printed a copy of it, I'll go over the activities starting in the top left:

#1: Arts and Crafts:  I have had some preschoolers who will do 3-5 art or craft projects every day, and others who will not do any! Like I mentioned before, children will gravitate toward the activities that are most helpful for them, so if your preschooler wants to do art all day, that's wonderful! If they don't want to do any art, that's okay too! I would still provide an opportunity to do some kind of art or craft that they might like at least once or twice a week, but I wouldn't force them to work on it any longer than they want to. I have two children relatively close in age, and when we did art projects together one of them would spend more than an hour on the project every time while the other would spend about six minutes. Literally! And that's okay! They were both getting different things out of the project.

Arts and crafts can help strengthen fine motor skills, develop math, reading, and science skills, and provide a visual outlet for children's creativity, emotions, feelings, and ideas. People have told me they have children who "just want to paint all day," and that's totally okay!

#2: Outside Play: Outside play strengthens large muscles, builds endurance, trains neurons in the brain to communicate across both halves of the brain, helps develop math, reading, and science skills, helps with emotional regulation, and strengthens immune systems. I actually feel like outside play is so beneficial that children need to be outdoors every day, even if it's not their favorite thing! It doesn't need to be long, and they can always find something to do outdoors that they like...even if it is coloring, playing with stickers, or another activity that actually could be done indoors too. ;) 

#3: Hands-on Experiments & Exploration: These activities can be done at a desk, a standing "station," outside, in the sink, in the tub, or dozens of other locations! 

Some examples of these activities include...
** A walk where you take the time to investigate cool pinecones, sticks, bugs, or other interesting things you child sees
** Playing in a sandbox or at the beach
** Experimenting with baking soda and vinegar
** Mixing, pouring, and squeezing water in different bowls, cups, or sponges
** Sensory bins
** Building a tower, castle, car garage, maze, or something else with magnetic blocks (or any other kind of stacking toy)
** MANY other experiments or explorations!

You can see there is a huge variety of things to explore and experiment with! Ironically, most of the messes preschoolers make deliberately come from a desire to experiment. ;)  Follow your children's interests in this category, but feel free to introduce new experiences. Seasonal sensory bins and experiments are some of my favorites! I also have a collection of things that pop, fizz, erupt, and explode here -- they're some of our personal favorite experiments!

Children can learn a TON from exploring and experimenting! You can tie in loads of different science and history lessons. They are also developing skills that will help them in math, reading, writing, science, and more. They are developing longer attention spans, solving problems, learning cause and effect, strengthening fine motor and writing muscles, developing observation and analysis skills, and much more.

#4: PE / Physical Movement: There are a lot of benefits to exercise, but that's not really the point of this article. I will briefly mention that high-energy movement for 20+ straight minutes a day will help regulate your children's energy, emotions, and more (even diet and cravings)! Aside from the physical benefits of high-energy movement, it also helps develop "academic" skills! 

For example, doing sommersaults (forward rolls), spinning on a tire swing, and flipping off your couch develop inner ear balance and the capacity to focus on many small objects quickly in a row -- these are necessary skills for reading! Large muscle exercise also strengthens children's core, which allows them to sit and focus on activities longer as they grow older. Preschoolers also experiment, learn cause and effect principles, and problem solve as they choose what parts of the couch are best to flip off of, predict where they will land, and feel the impact of using different amounts of force as they move.

There are TONS of different physical activities you can use! Here are a few:
** Dance parties
** Floor is Lava
** Couch flips
** Playing at the playground
** Tag
** Races
** Organized classes (like gymnastics, dance, karate, etc)
** Many more! (again, go with what your kids love!)

#5: Reading: There are only two activities in this list that I think you really need to include in every single day. The first one was outdoor play. Reading is the second. Read to your preschooler! Find the most fun, outrageous, serious, and engaging books! Look at fiction and non-fiction! Read picture books! If your child has the attention span, read novels! Look at the pictures. Talk about the pictures, the story line, the characters, and the ending. What might happen after the story? Who wrote the book? Who drew the pictures.

Engaging with books has so many benefits that thousands of books have been written about it. I will try to summarize by saying that when you read with your child you are helping them develop language skills, reading skills, writing skills, math skills, logic skills, science skills, and more. At the same time they are building relationships, learning stories, and discovering people and places around the world...and in other worlds!

Some preschoolers love books. They enjoy finding letters and analyzing pictures. They bring you books and ask you to stay up late looking at more. Reading with them is easy! 

Some preschoolers struggle to hold still long enough to listen to a whole book. This is okay! I have worked with several children like this, and I personally have one child who literally could not hold still for two minutes as a preschooler. This child was a "late" reader, but was reading on a typical grade level by the end of 3rd grade. Here are a few ways to read with children who don't hold still:

** Read to them while they play.
** Read to them while they eat.
** Read to them in a funny position (they find it a little irresistible)! For example, lay on the couch, but put the book on the floor. Lean your head and elbows down by the book, and just start reading. Your preschooler might lay down next to you, almost upside down, and look at a few pictures.
** Tell them stories while you play with them. Use cars, action figures, or other toys to act out the story you're making up. Or use the toys to act out a story you've already heard. ;) 

However you do it, reading to your preschoolers will benefit them!

#6: Music: Music helps children develop language, math, reading, science, and other skills. There are SO many ways to introduce music, especially with modern technology! Here are a few of my favorites:

** Dance parties (5-30 minutes long, depending on your kids!)
** Freeze Dance
** Watching music videos
** Singing songs or nursery rhymes
** Playing music while you clean or sort laundry
** Singing at bedtime
** Age appropriate music classes 

#7: Creative/Imaginative Play: This may just seem like your preschooler is playing with toys or dressing up, but it actually helps develop language and reasoning skills, communication skills, and processing skills that help with math and reading! Plus, it's loads of fun!

#8: Every-Day Activities & Field Trips: The daily activities and trips you go on lead to SO much brain development and skill strengthening that it would also be impossible to list them all! The shortened version of benefits includes math, reading, science, social studies, language, communication, problem solving, and more skills! And if you talk about what you are doing, the processes you are using, and what will happen next, you speed that development even more!

What falls in this category? Here are a few examples:

** Sorting laundry 
** Doing dishes
** Grocery shopping
** Visiting museums
** Playing at a park
** Picking up toys
** Visiting the library
** Cooking
** Visiting fire or police stations
** Bird watching
** Getting dressed
** And so much more!

Yes, even getting dressed counts as part of a preschooler's education! During this simple, short process they are learning about sequence, larger/smaller size concepts, prediction, cause and effect, and communication. If you talk during the process you can tie in colors, numbers, left/right, time, and rhyming/phonics skills.

What might seem like a simple grocery store trip actually includes math, reading, communication, prediction, problem solving, social studies, science, and more!

I have met many people who feel like they "get nothing done" on grocery or doctor days, but the fact is your preschoolers learn just as much (and likely much more) during a trip to the doctor or grocery store as they do during a desk activity. Which actually brings me to...

#9: Desk Games & Activities: These are activities that can be done sitting down at a desk. I actually did put them last because they are my least favorite, partly because they are less effective than some of the others and partly because I have a short attention span (so it is hard for me to sit at a desk very long)!

There was a time when every single child I had worked with preferred any activity over a desk activity, but... that has changed. As I've worked with more children, I've discovered something: some children really love desk activities!

The first few kids I worked with who really liked worksheet-style activities made me think their parents had just taught them to like writing. Life has a way of humbling you, though, and I realized I was completely mistaken when one of my own children LOVED worksheet-style activities! To be honest, I was a little shocked! I had always given my kids room to pursue what interested them the most, so when I had a 2-year old who suddenly wanted to write (on paper!), I was definitely surprised! As the years went by, I actually had more than one child of my own who truly enjoys worksheets. If this is your child, let them do those worksheet activities!

If this is not your child, do NOT worry about it! Some preschoolers are not ready or interested in worksheet-style activities. Some are. Both are fine. Both end up reading and writing, and both are wonderful people! 

Just remember our original 3 Big Picture Goals:

1- Help develop a love of learning.
2- Encourage a broad range of experiences.
3- Develop skills to learn more.

 The best way to know what your preschoolers are ready for is by following their lead--what are they interested in? Remember we want to introduce a variety of experiences, but we need to pay attention to how our preschoolers respond to those activities.  If an experience is creating a lot of stress in our young children, we need to "shelve" it for a little while and try coming back to it after our preschoolers have had a chance to grow and develop a little more.  Interestingly, when we are stressed, we actually create hormones that literally make learning difficult! It is better to let our preschoolers learn and experience something different than to create a sense of dread and stress associated with school time.

I hope this list of activities and discussion about the different ways to teach our preschoolers has been helpful! Next week we will look at schedules, routines, and planning in this  How to Homeschool Preschool series!  Bookmark THIS PAGE to get links to all the lessons, and "join" THIS EVENT on Facebook to see me deliver everything "live" as it is ready!

As always, thank you for being here!

Let me know if you have any specific questions you'd like me to cover, and...

Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



Never miss another post again!  Sign up for our weekly updates newsletter and get links to all our posts once a week in your inbox!  Sign up here!! 



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Wednesday, October 7, 2020

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Homeschool Preschool: What Preschoolers Need to Know

This is our first How to Homeschool Preschool class! The topic for today is: What Preschoolers Need to Know! And, as you read through the "lesson," you will find a link to get this fantastic little checklist for free! Before we get started, it's really important to point out a quick definition here: I consider 2-6 year old children "preschoolers." 



This definition is important because this list of skills is NOT one that I'd expect a 4-year old (or even many 5-year olds) to have completed. I think the "kindergarten" year should be spent playing and using every-day learning opportunities to teach these skills.

Finally, please read all the way to the end of this article! There is A LOT of good information, and I couldn't just stuff it all in the first few paragraphs!

So, let's get started...

Homeschool Preschool


What Preschoolers Need to Know


Preschoolers are delightful in a way no other age group is! Their excitement and energy are contagious, so it's no wonder that parents want to make sure they are guiding them correctly when they decide to homeschool preschool.

The good news is that it is not nearly as complicated as we sometimes make it!

When you begin to make plans to homeschool preschool, there are 3 "big picture" goals that you should consider EVERY single day!

BIG GOALS for Preschool Homeschool Teachers:

#1: Grow a love of learning.

#2: Encourage a broad range of experiences for your preschoolers.

#3: Help your preschoolers develop the skills to learn more.

Let's look at these closer:

#1: Grow a love of learning.  Nothing you do will have a bigger, long-term impact on your child than helping them love to learn. If they see books as treasures and questions as great adventures to be solved, they will be motivated to learn to read, research, and so much more!  Can you imagine trying to teach a child to read who doesn't like books? Perhaps you've already tried to teach a child math who doesn't like numbers. Or science to a child who has already decided it's too hard.  

This is more important than ANY other bit of information your preschooler might learn! There is SO much time for your child to learn little things like phonemes and addition. There is very little time to help them develop an attitude of excitement toward learning!

Since this is the #1 most important goal for teaching preschoolers, we want to avoid making learning feel like a chore or something that must be rewarded if they stick it out. Choose fun books that are rewarding just to be read! Do science experiments that make them laugh and get them excited about trying! If they love letters and numbers, practice writing and spelling! But if they burst into tears every time you pull out a reading curriculum, be willing to put that curriculum on the shelf for a few months or years, and pull out an exciting picture book (or chapter book) to read TO your preschooler.

#2: Encourage a broad range of experiences for your preschoolers.  Young children (like older children), learn new information best if they have already learned something related to the new information, and can make the connection between the new and the old. (Read this article for lots of details on how preschoolers' minds work!)  What you will discover is that the more life experiences and things that your children know, the easier and more exciting it is for them to learn new things.

I like to imagine "closets" in my kids' minds. Preschoolers' minds are not designed to learn separate, little pieces of information (like the sound "d" makes). But if you give them "closets" to "hang" that information in, they remember it better (like if you associate the letter "d" with "dogs," they might "hang" the "d" sound in a closet with "dogs," or "animals I like." The more "closets" you help them build as a preschooler, the more places you help them create to store new information! Eventually they might hang "homeostasis" with "dogs" too, since they know that dogs pant when they are hot and grow extra hair for the winter!

#3: Help your preschoolers develop the skills to learn more as they grow.  We know that you cannot learn to read before you know that letters represent sounds, and you cannot learn to add before you know how to count. Preschool is a great time to develop these "first" skills, mostly through play and hands-on activities!

==> Since I have had MANY parents ask me what those basic skills are that preschoolers need, I have developed this checklist. It is based on my observations of children in group settings (in schools, churches, and community classes), state standards from Texas and Virginia, and NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) recommendations. Please take note of the four points (marked by arrows) below!

==> All these "goals" can be accomplished through play and every-day activities! Be sure to read the next article in this series for more details about preschool activities!

==> I encourage parents homeschooling preschool to achieve these skills BEFORE beginning a formal math or reading curriculum. Usually this is either by the time your child turns six years old OR (if you plan to enroll them in a public or private kindergarten) before they begin kindergarten.

==> I know 3-year olds who know and can do everything on this list. That's great! If that's your preschooler, then just keep learning what is most interesting to your child. Remember that there are two other BIG PICTURE goals during these years, and the world is full of things that they can learn!

==> There are some children who will NOT be able to do all the pre-reading skills before they are six. If your doctor has confirmed that there are no developmental delays or learning disorders that need addressing, DO NOT stress about this! Notice that pre-reading skills account for less than 1/4 of all the skills that your preschooler can be working on! Like walking and learning to use the bathroom, the physical and neural development needed for reading happens at different ages for everyone. (And like walking and using the bathroom, parents of early readers usually let everybody else know just how early it happened--do not let this overshadow the #1 goal {love of learning} for the preschool years!!)  Studies actually show that most children's reading skills equalize around 3rd or 4th grade, and if you take a classroom of 4th graders, you generally cannot tell which children learned to read when they were 4 and which learned when they were 7. Interestingly, Finnish teenagers generally outperform American teenagers in reading, math, and science...and children in Finland do not start formal reading lessons until they are 7. In fact, they engage in play-based preschool from 3-6 years old!  

SOooooo... would you like this checklist?

If so, just CLICK HERE! You can print, save, or download it!

I hope it is helpful to you!

NOW that you have the checklist in hand, let's point out a few things on it:

#1: You can "teach" everything on the list through play. There is no need for formal lessons during preschool (2-6 years old). Part 2 in this series includes nine common activities that "teach" these skills for preschoolers! 

#2: Notice that pre-reading skills account for less than 1/4 of the entire list. Please do not become so pre-occupied with pre-reading and writing skills that you miss out on othere fun adventures of the preschool years. If your child especially loves letters and numbers, definitely spend more time with them! But if your child loves being outside, digging in dirt, building train tracks, or mixing vinegar and baking soda over and over and over... do those things too!

#3: I separated the skills into categories because it is easier for our minds to process things that are "chunked" or broken into groups, but the fact is that each item in every group actually helps develop skills in other groups. For example, I listed "skipping" and "rolling" in the "Physical Skills" category. These two physical skills also train your brain to send neural impulses across both hemispheres, which helps develop Reading and Math skills. These activities also require the eyes to focus on a quick succession of objects, which prepares them to read fluently. These same activities help develop a sense of spatial awareness that helps develop observation and prediction skills ("Science & Reasoning" category). These same activities strengthen core muscles, which allow children to sit longer and develop "Material Skills." And, if they are doing these skills at your suggestion and with siblings, they are working on following instructions, working with others, taking turns, solving problems, and other "Personal & Social Skills." Similarly, other skills overlap in different categories!

#4: Remember that children develop different skills at different times. Do not get stressed out if your child isn't ready for all these skills when you are! Review the fourth arrow point above. The best way to know what your preschoolers are ready for is by following their lead--what are they interested in? Remember we want to introduce a variety of experiences, but we need to pay attention to how our preschoolers respond to those activities.  If an experience is creating a lot of stress in our young children, we need to "shelve" it for a little while and try coming back to it after our preschoolers have had a chance to grow and develop a little more.  Interestingly, when we are stressed, we actually create hormones that literally make learning difficult! It is better to let our preschoolers learn and experience something different than to create a sense of dread and stress associated with school time.

#5: Finally, working through this list one topic at a time is a very boring way to set up preschool!  Play is the best way to "teach" these skills! During the next few lessons in this How to Homeschool Preschool series, I will be sharing fun ways to learn and engage your preschoolers as well as ideas for organizing your lessons, days, units, and more! Bookmark THIS PAGE to get links to all the lessons, and "join" THIS EVENT on Facebook to see me deliver everything "live" as it is ready!

As always, thank you for being here!

Let me know if you have any specific questions you'd like me to cover, and...

Happy Educating,
Carla


Have you seen HEEP? It is a preschool homeschool curriculum! Learn more here!



Never miss another post again!  Sign up for our weekly updates newsletter and get links to all our posts once a week in your inbox!  Sign up here!! 



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